Landforms of County Meath: Mountains and Hills of County Meath, Rivers of County Meath, Hill of Tara, Loughcrew, River Boyne, River Tolka Books LLC

ISBN: 9781158109029

Published: June 13th 2010

Paperback

34 pages


Description

Landforms of County Meath: Mountains and Hills of County Meath, Rivers of County Meath, Hill of Tara, Loughcrew, River Boyne, River Tolka  by  Books LLC

Landforms of County Meath: Mountains and Hills of County Meath, Rivers of County Meath, Hill of Tara, Loughcrew, River Boyne, River Tolka by Books LLC
June 13th 2010 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 34 pages | ISBN: 9781158109029 | 10.75 Mb

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Mountains and Hills of County Meath, Rivers of County Meath,MorePurchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Mountains and Hills of County Meath, Rivers of County Meath, Hill of Tara, Loughcrew, River Boyne, River Tolka, Faughan Hill, Hill of Ward, Slieve Na Calliagh, River Dee, County Louth, River Owenroe.

Excerpt: Hill of Tara - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Layout of the Hill of TaraAt the summit of the hill, to the north of the ridge, is an oval Iron Age hilltop enclosure, measuring 318 metres (1,043 ft) north-south by 264 metres (866 ft) east-west and enclosed by an internal ditch and external bank, known as Rith na Rogh (the Fort of the Kings, also known as the Royal Enclosure). The most prominent earthworks within are the two linked enclosures, a bivallate ring fort and a bivallete ring barrow known as Teach Chormaic (Cormacs House) and the Forradh or Royal Seat. In the middle of the Forradh is a standing stone, which is believed to be the Lia Fil (Stone of Destiny) at which the High Kings were crowned.

According to legend, the stone would scream if a series of challenges were met by the would-be king. At his touch the stone would let out a screech that could be heard all over Ireland. To the north of the ring-forts is a small Neolithic passage tomb known as Dumha na nGiall (the Mound of the Hostages), which was constructed around 3,400 (cal.) BC. To the north, just outside the bounds of the Rith na Rig, is a ringfort with three banks known as Rith na Seanadh (the Rath of the Synods). Excavations of this monument have produced Roman artifacts dating from the 1st-3rd centuries.

Further north is a long, narrow rectangular feature known as the Banqueting Hall (Teach Miodhchuarta), although it is more likely to have been a ceremonial avenue or cursus monument approaching the site, and three circular earthworks known as the Sloping Trenc... More: http://booksllc.net/?id=241133



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